Royal Canadian Mounted Police

RCMP Accessibility Plan 2023-2025: Progress Report 2023

On this page

  1. Alternate formats
  2. List of acronyms and abbreviations
  3. General
  4. Pillars under the Accessibility Canada Act
  5. Consultation
  6. Feedback
  7. Conclusion
  8. Annex A - Definitions of disability
  9. Footnotes

Alternate formats

List of acronyms and abbreviations

IT
Information technology
HR
Human resources
RCMP
Royal Canadian Mounted Police

General

Message from Nadine Huggins, Chief Human Resources Officer

Nadine Huggins
Chief Human Resources Officer

Colleagues,

As Chief Human Resources Officer and as equity, diversity, and inclusion Champion at the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, I am pleased to share our first progress report against "Building an Accessible RCMP: The Framework to Deliver the First Departmental Accessibility Strategy and Accessibility Plan" (the Accessibility Plan). As we celebrate our 150th anniversary with humility and pride, this progress report illustrates our continued commitment to becoming more accessible and to fulfilling our obligations under the "Accessible Canada Act" (the Act). As an employer, we aim to create a work environment that is respectful, healthy, and inclusive for all employees. As a service provider, we aim to remove barriers and make services accessible for all.

Coming into effect on July 11, 2019 with a purpose to create a Canada without barriers by 2040, the Act is a major advancement in federal disability rights legislation. It challenges us to be proactive about accessibility and to consult with persons with disabilities to make programs and services accessible from the start. As such, the RCMP's Accessibility Plan, along with the attached progress report, was developed in consultation with the RCMP's accessibility community and subject matter experts representing various regions across the country. One of our key accomplishments this past fiscal year was to stand up the RCMP Disability and Accessibility Network and Action Group, which provided the foundation necessary to carry out consultations.

The RCMP's Accessibility Plan is evergreen and will be updated as we continue to learn and grow through consultation and co-development, and within the context of our continuously evolving environment. We all benefit when we make accessibility a part of our every-day considerations. Together, we will achieve a fully accessible RCMP.

Continuing meaningful collaboration with our accessibility and disability communities as we embed an inclusive culture through addressing systemic harassment and discrimination, positions us to fully leverage the workforce of the future, including persons with disabilities, to meet the evolving needs of the RCMP as well as in the communities we serve.

This progress report provides an analysis of what has been done to-date towards implementing the RCMP's Accessibility Plan and includes highlights and summaries of various undertakings in 2022-2023 in an effort to advance equity, accountability and trust with accessibility and disability communities. Within our capacity as a large and distributed federal policing organization, the RCMP is fully committed to leveraging this unique opportunity to meaningfully shape and impact the Government of Canada's accessibility, equity and inclusion goals.

Nadine Huggins
Chief Human Resources Officer

RCMP Accessibility Plan 2023-2025: Progress Report 2023

Accountability and governance

The accountability for implementing the Accessible Canada Act in the RCMP lies with the defined Accessibility Leadership. Accessibility related proposals go through the organization's existing governance structure Footnote 1 in an effort to ensure that across the RCMP, we are embedding accessibility priorities in order to collectively advance this work.

Accessibility leadership

Accessibility lead
  • Nadine Huggins, Chief Human Resources Officer, equity, diversity, and inclusion Champion
Equity, diversity and inclusion unit
  • Tahanee McKnight, Executive Director, Human Resources Policies, Strategies and Programs and Senior Designated Official for Employment Equity, Diversity and Inclusion
  • Alia Meghji, Acting Director, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion
  • Sayeeda Jaigirdar, Project Lead, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Senior Advisor

RCMP Governance

Level 1 committees
  • Senior Executive Committee
  • Communications and Coordination Committee
Level 2 committees
  • Finance, IT and Human Resources Committee
Governance structures
  • Departmental Lead for the implementation of the Accessible Canada Act (Nadine Huggins, Chief Human Resources Officer)
  • Human Resources-Policies, Strategies and Programs Directorate (Tahanee McKnight, Executive Director)
  • Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Unit (Alia Meghji, Acting Director)
  • Accessibility Task Force
  • RCMP Portfolio Accessibility Community of Practice
  • RCMP Accessibility and Disability Network and Action Group
  • Pillar Leads, the business units below will own both the responsibility and accountability for the development and implementation of the pillar-specific plans inside the broader Accessibility Plan.
  1. Communication (other than information and communication technologies) Chief Human Resources Officer and others as identified in the Accessibility Plan
  2. Employment - Chief Human Resources Officer and others as identified in Accessibility Plan
  3. Built environment - Property Management and others as identified in the Accessibility Plan
  4. Design and delivery of services and programs - Various leads as identified in the Accessibility Plan
  5. Procurement of goods services and facilities - Procurement and Contracting and others as identified in the Accessibility Plan
  6. Information management and Communication Technology - IT and others as identified in the Accessibility Plan
  7. Transportation- Fleet Management and others as identified in Accessibility Plan

Contact information for feedback

Below is a description of our feedback process, which will facilitate the provision of anonymous feedback both internally and externally:

  • The present Accessibility Plan and progress reports are to be published on the RCMP internal and external website. They will also be published on open.canada.ca
  • The designated person for receiving feedback is Galina Ivanova, Employment Equity Research Analyst and Project Coordinator, at the following email address: rcmpaccessibility-accessibilitegrc@rcmp-grc.gc.ca
  • A survey is published on the RCMP website, which will capture employee and client feedback on the implementation of the present Accessibility Plan
  • As they are surfaced, issues will be addressed through governance structures
  • Periodically as the Accessibility Plan is updated, it will reflect the feedback received
  • A person may use the contact information listed to request a copy of the feedback process description in an alternate format

Contact information to reach out to the RCMP

By email

The designated contact person for receiving feedback or for an accessible version of this document is Galina Ivanova, Employment Equity Research Analyst and Project Coordinator, at the following email address at rcmpaccessibility-accessibilitegrc@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

By mail

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Unit
73 Leikin Drive
M5-4 Mailstop 52
Ottawa ON  K1A 0R2

By toll-free number
1-833-690-3508

Pillars under the Accessibility Canada Act

Communication, other than information and communication technologies

Desired outcome

The overall desired result for Communication (Other than information and communication technologies) is to ensure existing and new communication content are accessible for all users.

Barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan

  • Ambiguous policy and program governances
  • Poor leadership awareness or training in Inclusion and Diversity
  • Lack of awareness of the needs of the disability community
  • Lack of communications in accessible, plain language formats and related training

How have we progressed in removing or preventing barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan?

The hard work has begun in the RCMP to remove barriers identified in the areas of communication (other than information and communication technologies). Policies are being redefined to be less ambiguous and more streamlined. Program governance structures are being realigned to accommodate the needs of disabled persons in the RCMP. A new task group called the RCMP Accessibility Pillar Leads Taskforce has been set up to align the accessibility work that is being done on several pillars. One of the functions of the taskforce is to nominate and appoint a Disability Champion.

Diversity and Inclusion, Anti-Racism, and Leadership training has begun for senior leadership. For example, the following courses have been made mandatory for all employees including senior leadership:

  1. Uniting Against Racism Learning Series
  2. Cultural Awareness and Humility Course

There is a need to implement more awareness and training on accessibility to senior leadership and employee. Discussions are in progress in the organization, in consultation with the RCMP Disability and Accessibility Employee Network and Action Group. The RCMP is also developing performance management objectives for executives to measure progress made in accessibility and inclusion in their teams.

Since the Spring of 2022, the RCMP National Learning Services has taken the necessary steps to educate the division on the importance of accessibility and the requirements of the Accessible Canada Act. As a first step, an internal Accessibility Working Group was created and a management champion was identified to lead National Learning Services through the necessary steps to becoming a more accessible learning organization. National Learning Services actively supported and funded training for its staff on the different aspects of accessibility and how it will impact the work of instructional designers and multimedia developers, focusing on awareness as the first step.

The RCMP fully supports the Government of Canada's awareness campaigns, including the National Disability Employment Awareness Month and Persons with Disabilities programming. Key awareness campaigns, resources and tools are being socialized across the organization to promote the full implementation of the Accessibility Strategy on an annual basis. E-newsletters and an equity, diversity, and inclusion website is fully dedicated to such communications. Recently, RCMP employees were invited to participate in such awareness campaigns run by Health Canada. Among the topics discussed were "Neurodiversity in the Workplace: From Accommodation to Empowerment" and "Leading Beyond the Checkbox: Supporting the Advancement, Access and Equity of Employees with Disabilities".

The RCMP is promoting, attending and sharing Government of Canada accessibility network meetings to promote accessibility knowledge sharing across the government of Canada.

The search for an Executive National Champion and Divisional Co-Champions for Accessibility has begun with consultations from Disability Networks and key stakeholders. Efforts are being streamlined to keep communications in accessible and written in plain language. As accessible communications offer challenges with the availability of resources within the RCMP, there is a look out for communication consultants who understand issues that people with disabilities face and who can operate in the Accessible medium

Employment

Desired outcome

To recruit, retain and promote persons with disabilities and offer timely workplace accommodations.

Barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan

  • A lack of effective employment equity analysis and benchmarking of recruiting, retention and promotions rates for employees with disabilities
  • Lack of equity, diversity, and inclusion training and disability management
  • Lack of disability recruitment milestones for public service employees, regular members, civilian members and students
  • Inefficient staffing practices recruitment of persons with disabilities

How have we progressed in removing or preventing barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan?

In 2023, the RCMP is working towards the development of a software system that will capture equity, diversity, and inclusion data that will support the organization in conducting employment equity analysis. The company is conducting analysis of the RCMP HR systems and is going through stakeholder sessions to inform the software. Once the software is set up, this will be effective in identifying where systemic barriers exist in staffing processes at the corporate and hiring manager levels, as well as possible solutions.

The RCMP is also participating in the Government of Canada's modernization of the self-identification questionnaire and Inclusion campaign software systems set up process, and has participated in all stakeholder meetings. It is creating a structure to roll out communications regarding the new self-identification tool. This initiative will be implemented along with the Government of Canada's roll-out in the near future. The data collected through this new questionnaire will better describe the organization workforce employment equity and diversity, inform recruitment and retention goals, shed light on diversity gaps, and inform RCMP programs and policies.

RCMP Labour Relations Advisors started their training in disability management, the Government of Canada Accessibility Passport and Accommodation in the fall of 2023. The training was led by a facilitator from the RCMP's Accessibility and Disability Network who has been certified as a trainer by the Government of Canada Accessibility Office. The Network has been a source of consultation for this training as well.

The RCMP's Recruitment Office and RCMP Staffing have begun to set up disability recruitment milestones (regular members, civilian members and public servant employees) for each Division (via targeted events such as October's Disability Employment Awareness Month) and is focused on student recruitment.

In addition, RCMP Corporate Staffing has taken the following initiatives which have had a positive impact on accessibility:

  • In 2020, RCMP Corporate staffing moved sub-delegation training from in-class, facilitator-led, set schedule to online, self-directed/paced, on demand, all of which enabled the learner to have greater control over the learning experience. This improved access for persons with physical and learning disabilities as the use of Agora in the design/delivery of training also means adoption of industry-standard look and feel (in contrast to non-expert designed power point decks), which improves accessibility for some with learning/cognitive/visual disabilities.
  • In 2021, integrated Inclusive Hiring Practices for a Diverse Workforce (COR120) in sub-delegation curriculum.
  • In 2023, rolled out changes to policy, delegation framework in response to July 1 coming into force of Public Service Employment Act changes related to bias and barriers in assessment.

More progress will be reported on this and other staffing practices in future progress reports.

Built environment

Desired outcome

To have welcoming, barrier-free access to RCMP buildings, offices and facilities across the country.

Barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan

Barriers are faced by clients and employees with respect to:

  • Accessible parking places not available
  • Accessible pathways and doorways
  • Accessible washrooms
  • Accessible issues with service animals in the workplace

How have we progressed in removing or preventing barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan?

The RCMP's Real Property and Environmental Management Branch's Property Management Manual requires that RCMP-owned and leased facilities are accessible and barrier free and meet the requirements of the Standard on Barrier-Free Access to Real Property as outlined in the Directive on the Management of Real Property.

RCMP Real Property has a common design for small-sized detachments which includes all access locker room and barrier free access features. To date, four detachments (Ingonish, Rocky Harbour, Luduc and Cochrane) are piloting all access locker rooms.

Additionally, the Real Property and Environmental Management Branch is signing a Memorandum of Understanding with Accessibility Standards Canada in the near future that will allow Real Property to regularly consult Accessibility Standards Canada on standards and best practices to improve technical standards and guidance for the RCMP real property community. RCMP Real Property will collaborate with Accessibility Standards Canada, to establish a common understanding of accessibility in the built environment in an RCMP context and identify criteria, standards and best practices to work towards RCMP sites being state-of-the art: inclusive, accessible and welcoming. RCMP technical standards for detachments will be regularly reviewed by Accessibility Standards Canada and recommendations will be received for areas of improvement to make our facilities more accessible. RCMP will update published workplace and base building design documents to ensure consistency and coordination with the standards established by Accessibility Standards Canada where feasible. Accessibility Standards Canada has signed six Memorandum of Understanding, four with provinces and two Memorandum of Understanding with other federal government departments.

The RCMP is starting to create the governance structure to create and maintain internal and external networks to monitor progress. This will start the contract process for a nation-wide audit of base building elements and of RCMP tenant spaces, including client service spaces and animal policy and program. More will be reported in future progress reports.

Design and delivery of programs and services

Desired outcome

The overall desired result for Designs and Delivery of Services and Programs is to ensure In-person, phone and online client services are accessible for persons with disabilities.

Barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan

  • Availability of disability management services for Public Service employees
  • Modest understanding of Accommodation, Disability and Disability Management by RCMP Managers, Supervisors and Labour relations Advisors
  • Disability Management seen as adversarial by management and employees

How have we progressed in removing or preventing barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan?

In 2023, RCMP has begun to explore the ability to establish an office or a virtual hub for disability management and accessibility. The organization has developed a framework for a possible disability management program for Public Service employees. The framework is currently being consulted on with divisional staff. Next steps are to incorporate feedback into the framework and then consult with unions. The RCMP Disability and Accessibility Employee Network and Action group for employees has also been consulted and asked to provide their input. There will also be ongoing review and monitoring of disability management programs for all categories of employees. The RCMP Duty to Accommodate guidelines is being updated and consulted upon this progress cycle. The Government of Canada Workplace Accessibility Passport will also be launched in 2023-2024 training cycle.

Future progress reports will see training for Managers on updated disability management guidelines and program review of and update of the Bias Free Policing Program and the Service Animal policy and program.

Information and communication technologies

Desired outcome

To ensure our organization has relevant, up-to-date technology and information management infrastructure that meet the needs of persons with disabilities.

Barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan

  • Training and support for adaptive IT tools and technologies required
  • Accessible documents in the workplace required
  • Accessible Learning content required
  • Detailed accessibility assessment of Human Resources Management Information System required

How have we progressed in removing or preventing barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan?

In 2023, the RCMP is starting to create the governance structure to create and maintain internal and external committees to implement and monitor progress. This will also kick start the process of creating an Information and Communication technologies framework for accessibility, with input from employee networks. In the near future, processes will be put in place to enhance training and support for adaptive IT tools and technologies, with a particular focus on the hybrid work environment.

As previously mentioned, the RCMP National Learning Services has taken the necessary steps to educate the division on the importance of accessibility and the requirements of the Accessible Canada Act. National Learning Services actively supported and funded training for its staff on the different aspects of accessibility and how it will impact the work of instructional designers and multimedia developers; focusing on awareness as the first step. Over the last 18 months, the working group has:

  • Facilitated 3 Accessibility Awareness Sessions:
    • Accessible Design - Part 1 (Theory)
    • Accessible Design - Part 2 (Practical)
    • 3-part Guest speaker series:
      • Employment and Social Development Canada Journey Towards Accessibility
      • FABLE Presentation
      • Assistive Technology User Experience (A day in the life of assistive technology user)
  • Participated in both design and development training to improve the level of accessibility in our training products:
    • David Berman Communications - Basic Training
    • University of Guelph Accessibility Conference
    • eLearning Guild - Accessibility and Inclusion
    • Deque University
    • International Association of Accessibility Professionals Certification
    • Web Accessibility Specialist
  • Researched, created and shared tools to help instructional designers and multimedia developers start to incorporate accessible design and technical features into our learning:
    • Inclusive Design - Job-Aids and Checklists
    • Installation of the Accessibility Ribbon in Office Suite
    • Learning Delivery (eLearning and Classroom materials) Standards

In the coming year, RCMP National Learning Services will continue to do research and take the steps necessary to embed accessibility in our development processes and training.

Procurement of goods, services, and facilities

Desired outcome

To ensure accessibility criteria are considered when buying goods, services and facilities, and products include accessibility features where appropriate.

Barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan

  • Need for procurement and contracting processes that reflect accessibility-related goods and services to support employees and clients with disabilities
  • Lack of central fund for the purchase of workplace related goods and services to facilitate accommodation

How have we progressed in removing or preventing barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan?

The RCMP is starting to create the governance structure to create and maintain internal and external committees to implement and monitor progress. This will also kick start the process of the acquisition of central funds for the purchase of workplace related goods and services to facilitate accommodation. Between 2023 through 2025, the RCMP will ensure accessibility criteria are fully understood and included as part of performance indicators. More will be reported in future progress reports.

Transportation

Desired outcome

To ensure the RCMP's transportation framework embeds accessibility and aligns with all accessibility requirements.

Barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan

  • Lack of guidelines for accessible transportation to RCMP facilities in every region
  • Updated review of transportation network

How have we progressed in removing or preventing barriers identified in the Accessibility Plan?

In 2023, the RCMP is starting to create the governance structure to create and maintain internal and external networks to monitor progress. This will commence the review of the transportation framework including policies, programs, procedures and infrastructure (that is vehicles). In the near future, the organization will update, streamline and improve processes for meeting the needs of employees with disabilities for adaptive transportation tools and technologies, including guidelines for accessible transportation in every region.

Consultation

The present Accessibility progress report leverages input from employees, partners, and clients, particularly those who identify as persons with disabilities, that was received through a variety of consultation and engagements, which will remain an ongoing element of this Plan. Consultation plans and progress reports will also be forthcoming as a result of these ongoing consultations.

The following section outlines the ways through which the RCMP has consulted with employees who identify as persons with disabilities and members of the public in matters related to accessibility, accommodations, barriers, harassment and discrimination, and other experiences with respect to accessibility at the RCMP, as well as analysis of the results from these consultations.

RCMP Disability and Accessibility Action Group and Network

The RCMP launched its Disability and Accessibility Action Group and Network in September 2022. Its mission is to advocate for disability-and accessibility-related issues by identifying and communicating best practices and solutions to challenges faced by employees with disabilities. The Action Group consists of employees from all categories of employees—regular members, civilian members and public service employees—in our organization and will provide input and advice to the Accessibility leadership, the Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Unit, the RCMP senior management team, and the National Council for Diversity and Inclusion to improve the working environment for all employees with disabilities.

In September 2022, the group held its inaugural meeting attended by a number of employees who identify as a person with a disability, who want to be an ally to persons with disabilities, or who are in a position to assist in the implementation of the RCMP's Accessibility Strategy and Accessibility Plan. Employees in attendance included those representing regular members, civilian members and public service employees from various Divisions and Business Lines.

Since its inception, the group has held numerous meetings and discussed various topics such as: accommodations, disability management, service animals, transportation, Government of Canada Workplace Accessibility Passport implementation, etc. Additionally, the RCMP consulted with the Persons with Disabilities on topics which included: accessibility in relation to transportation, the new RCMP Public Servants Disability Management framework manual review, the Government of Canada Workplace Accessibility Passport and related training of Labour relations Advisors.

The RCMP senior management met with this group in October 2023 to consult on matters regarding the Accessibility Plan and the first progress report. This meeting was led by the Executive Director of Human Resources Policies, Strategies and Programs, the acting Director of and members from the Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Unit. The consultation focused on the Government of Canada Workplace Accessibility Passport and challenges faced when seeking an accommodation, ableism, and the notion of how we get to the default "yes" when it comes to accommodations.

Interdepartmental HR Advisory Committee on Persons with Disabilities

The RCMP has supplemented its internal consultations by reaching out to interdepartmental groups such as the Interdepartmental HR Advisory Committee on Persons with Disabilities, allowing for greater perspective, a wider range of representation of various disabilities and the additional expertise of interdepartmental subject matter experts and opportunities for sharing valuable resources. One valuable source that was shared by this group was a report coming from the Conference Board of Canada on key findings related to people with disabilities. The report asked a key question, "How do the experiences of Persons with Disabilities in the workplace interfere with opportunities for career advancement?" The report found that, "Ableism is a form of discrimination that stems from the belief that "one's abilities or characteristics are determined by disability or that Persons with Disabilities as a group are inferior to non-disabled people."" Even those who mean well can display ableist attitudes or behaviours.

Ableism is one of the most notable and pervasive barriers preventing many Persons with Disabilities from advancing in their careers. Nearly all interviewees reported that they'd experienced ableist attitudes and discrimination at some point in their careers. Common examples of ableism in the workplace include:

  • underestimating the capacity for Persons with Disabilities to perform certain job functions—for example, employers may assume that Persons with Disabilities lack certain skills for a job without first asking whether any accommodations could make the role more accessible to a person with a disability;
  • overestimating the time and money associated with providing accommodations and making a position more accessible— Persons with Disabilities often require only small modifications

This report mirrored the barriers voiced by our RCMP employees in our consultations with them. These barriers are being addressed through the employment pillar in the Accessibility Strategy and Plan and through training on the Government of Canada Workplace Accessibility Passport that is being delivered by the RCMP Disability and Accessibility Action Group and Network to the Labour Relations community within the organization.

Government of Canada Workplace Accessibility Passport Adopter Community of Practice

This group also consists of Persons with Disabilities that the RCMP has consulted with on the Accessibility Plan and the progress report. The community has led the training of a RCMP facilitator for the Government of Canada Workplace Accessibility Passport. This training has led to Labour relations Advisors being trained on the Passport.

The Office of the Public Service Accessibility

The Office of Public Service Accessibility was established to prepare the Public Service to meet or exceed its obligations under the Accessible Canada Act. The Office of Public Service Accessibility mandate is to:

  • Develop and launch an Accessibility Strategy for the Public Service and implementation plan;
  • Provide expert advice, leadership and coordination to departments and agencies to implement the requirements of the Act; and,
  • Develop targeted initiatives to help improve workplace accessibility.

The RCMP published it's first Accessibility Plan in January 2023. Since then, it has consulted with members of the Office of Public Service Accessibility who have lived experiences of disabilities. In October, members also participated in the first meeting of the RCMP Accessibility Taskforce and contributed much to the Taskforce's understanding of the RCMP's accountabilities under the Act.

The Accessibility Network

The Accessibility Network is a Government of Canada network consisting of Public Servants who are leading the Accessibility work in their respective departments. It is also comprised of persons with disabilities and in turn consults with other interdepartmental networks. The RCMP is a member of this network and has consulted the network on the RCMP Accessibility Plan as well as the RCMP Accessibility Progress report, among other matters related to Accessibility.

The Canadian Human Rights Commission

The Canadian Human Rights Commission has inspected the first RCMP Accessibility Strategy and Accessibility Plan and has offered valuable insights and improvement pathways that the RCMP is now implementing in the Plan and in this progress report. The Canadian Human Rights Commission has also offered valued discernments as to how to consult with persons with disabilities and how to report on it through the Plan and the progress report. This collaborative approach that the Canadian Human Rights Commission has taken in its inspection process has aided the understanding of the Accessible Canada Act and the concerned legislation for the RCMP.

Feedback

How are we implementing our Accessibility Plan in the RCMP and fostering Accessibility?

These are some of the steps the RCMP is taking to embrace diverse identities, perspectives, and experiences in and across our organization. The paragraphs below highlight some of the progress made in implementing the Accessibility Plan and fostering Accessibility at the RCMP.

In September 2022, the first RCMP Disability and Accessibility Action Group and Network was launched, which marked a turning point for the organization to consider perspectives and lived experiences of people with disabilities, both employees and members of the public.

As such, in January 2023, the first-ever RCMP Accessibility Plan for identifying, removing, and preventing barriers to accessibility was tabled. This progress report will highlight the start of the implementation of the Plan.

In Fall 2023, the RCMP will also be launching the RCMP Accessibility Survey for Employees. The Survey will collect information on workplace accessibility, accommodations and barriers experienced by employees, and those living with a disability, pertaining to: employment lifecycle, information and communication technology, built / physical work environment, and communications.

The Government of Canada Workplace Accessibility Passport will soon be adopted at the RCMP. To ensure successful adoption, labour relations advisors, who have been trained by the RCMP's Accessibility Passport Facilitator, will advise RCMP managers across Canada on facilitating the Accessibility Passport for employees with disabilities.

The Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Unit just launched the RCMP Accessibility Task Force at the end of October to facilitate the implementation of the Accessibility Plan. The Accessibility Task Force is comprised of director generals from the Accessibility Pillars and attended by a member of the RCMP Disability and Accessibility Network. The taskforce centers a "nothing about us without us" approach on all activities and has embedded consultation and co-design into its terms of reference.

What barriers have people who interact with RCMP encountered?

Some of the barriers faced by employees and clients are as follows:

  • Ambiguous policy and program governances;
  • Poor leadership awareness or training in Inclusion and Diversity;
  • Lack of awareness of the needs of the disability community;
  • Lack of communications in Accessible and plain language formats;
  • A lack of effective employment equity analysis and benchmarking of recruiting, retention and promotions rates for employees with disabilities;
  • Lack of equity, diversity, and inclusion training and disability management;
  • Lack of disability recruitment milestones for public service employees, regular members, civilian members and students;
  • Efficient staffing practices for disability recruitment;
  • Accessible parking spaces;
  • Accessible pathways and doorways;
  • Accessible washrooms;
  • Accessible issues with service animals in the workplace;
  • Availability of Disability Management Services for Public Service employees;
  • Modest understanding of Accommodation, Disability and Disability Management by RCMP Managers, Supervisors and Labour relations Advisors;
  • Disability Management seen as Adversarial by Management and employees;
  • Training and support for adaptive IT tools and technologies required;
  • Accessible documents in the workplace required;
  • Accessible Learning content required;
  • Detailed Accessibility assessment of Human Resources Management Information System required;
  • Lack of guidelines for accessible transportation to RCMP facilities in every region;
  • Updated review of transportation network.

How have we considered the feedback we received?

The feedback that was received from various clients, and employees have been considered in the RCMP Accessibility Strategy and Plan and this progress report. Some of feedback is being implemented as reported under the various pillars in the preceding pages. Most of the feedback will be implemented in the next two years.

Conclusion

The RCMP continues to take deliberate action toward building a diverse, inclusive and accessible organization equipped to provide modern policing services. In the face of these and other evolving priorities, the RCMP remains focused on providing service excellence to Canadians and in all of the communities in which we serve.

The Accessibility Strategy and the Accessibility Plan and this Progress report reiterates this commitment. It was developed in consultation with employees with disabilities and subject matter experts representing various perspectives from across the country. As we look towards the future as an organization, we are committed to the RCMP Accessibility Statement and Vision and to ensuring enhanced accessibility for its employees and the public within the next 5 years:

The RCMP will have identified and addressed barriers within its direct control, resulting in employees and clients with disabilities having every opportunity to participate fully and equally in an inclusive, barrier-free environment where they can realize their potential and feel they truly belong.

Annex A - Definitions of disability

Source:

Below is a list of acts and definitions pertaining to disability, persons with a disability and, disabled.

Employment Equity Act (section 3)

Persons with disabilities means persons who have a long-term or recurring physical, mental, sensory, psychiatric or learning impairment and who:

  1. consider themselves to be disadvantaged in employment by reason of that impairment, or
  2. believe that an employer or potential employer is likely to consider them to be disadvantaged in employment by reason of that impairment,

and includes persons whose functional limitations owing to their impairment have been accommodated in their current job or workplace.

The Employment Equity Team at Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat is now using the French term "Personnes en situation de handicap" which aligns with international usage and replaces the legislative term "Personnes handicapées" that appears in the Employment Equity Act and the Employment Equity Regulations. The legal definition has not changed.

Accessible Canada Act (section 2)

Disability means any impairment, including a physical, mental, intellectual, cognitive, learning, communication or sensory impairment — or a functional limitation — whether permanent, temporary or episodic in nature, or evident or not, that, in interaction with a barrier, hinders a person's full and equal participation in society.

Barrier means anything — including anything physical, architectural, technological or attitudinal, anything that is based on information or communications or anything that is the result of a policy or a practice — that hinders the full and equal participation in society of persons with an impairment, including a physical, mental, intellectual, cognitive, learning, communication or sensory impairment or a functional limitation.

Canadian Human Rights Act (section 25)
Disability means any previous or existing mental or physical disability and includes disfigurement and previous or existing dependence on alcohol or a drug.
Public Service Superannuation Act (section 3)
Disabled means incapable of pursuing regularly any substantially gainful occupation.
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
Equality rights are intended to ensure that everyone is treated with the same respect, dignity and consideration (that is without discrimination), regardless of personal characteristics such as race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age, or mental or physical disability, sexual orientation, residency, marital status or citizenship.
United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (Preamble)
  1. Recognizing that disability is an evolving concept and that disability results from the interaction between persons with impairments and attitudinal and environmental barriers that hinders their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others.
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